My 7 Favorite Cub Scout Crossover Ceremonies

Webelos Crossover CeremoniesWhile sending our little Cub Scouts off to Boy Scouts is bittersweet, most of us want to celebrate this milestone in their Scouting careers.  Many packs do this by holding one of these Cub Scout Crossover Ceremonies.

Crossover ceremonies are a way for the pack to say goodbye and for the troop to welcome them.  Just like the Arrow of Light ceremonies, you can find a plethora of crossover ceremonies online.  While I was researching this post, I read through quite a few and picked my 7 favorites.

Some of the 7 are very simple, and others are more elaborate.  Most of them use small wooden bridges, but there is one that uses a rope instead of a bridge.  I also included the ceremony we used for my son, Parker’s crossover where the boys were taken across a lake in canoes.

A few things to note:

  1. I didn’t write the ceremonies. For most of them, we don’t know who originally wrote them, but a huge thank you goes out to them.
  2. Because the original author is unknown for many of these, I am crediting the website where I first found the ceremony. If there is someone else who deserves the credit, let me know, and I’ll be glad to change it.
  3. These ceremonies only talk about crossover, so if your pack combines the Arrow of Light ceremony with crossover, you’ll need to modify the ceremony you use.  Read this collection of Arrow of Light ceremonies for more ideas.
  4. I modified some of the ceremonies.

To honor the boys who have earned their Arrow of Light rank,  use these awesome arrows from Vince’s Arrows!  My pack uses them, and everyone loves them.  You can read my full review here. Don’t forget to use coupon code cubscoutideas to get 10% off when you place your order.

arrow of light arrows

Click on the arrow beside each to read these Cub Scout Bridging Ceremony scripts.

Bridging Webelos to Scouts

This ceremony comes to us from the US Scouting Service Project.

PERSONNEL NEEDED:

  • Cubmaster
  • Webelos Leader
  • Den Chief
  • Scoutmaster
  • Webelos crossing over
  • Parents of Webelos crossing over

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • American flag
  • Pack flag
  • Troop flag
  • Bridge
  • Troop neckerchief for each Scout

ARRANGEMENT:

The bridge is in the center of stage area. The pack flag is to the left of the bridge. The American flag and troop flag are to the right. Webelos and parents are to the far left, to be escorted to the front. The Boy Scouts are to the right of the bridge.

CUBMASTER: The main goal of Cub Scouting is to prepare boys to become Boy Scouts. Tonight, it is my privilege to present to you our Cub Scouts that have decided to continue their Scouting trail. (Call forward each candidate by name and their parents.)

This ceremony of crossing the bridge marks your completion in Cub Scouting, just as it marks the beginning of a whole new experience in Boy Scouting. Congratulations and good luck!

(As each candidate approaches the bridge, the Webelos Leader and Den Chief remove the Webelos neckerchief and hand it to the Scout’s parents. Cubmaster gives each the Cub Scout handshake. Candidates and his parents cross over bridge together. Scoutmaster gives candidate the Scout handshake and welcomes him and his parents to the troop.)

SCOUTMASTER: We are happy to welcome you to our troop. (Give a short statement of what is expected of Scout.) Please repeat the Scout Oath with me. As a token of this important occasion, I would like to present you with the troop neckerchief. (After each has received his neckerchief, the Scoutmaster and new Scouts exchange the Boy Scout salute. All participants leave the stage area.)

Cross Over the Bridge Ceremony

This ceremony is also from the US Scouting Service Project.

PERSONNEL NEEDED:

  • Cubmaster
  • Scoutmaster
  • Webelos crossing over
  • Parents of Webelos crossing over

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • Bridge
  • Boy Scout Handbooks
  • Bridge
  • Boy Scout neckerchiefs

ARRANGEMENT:

Bridge is centered in the stage area. The Scoutmaster is to the right of the bridge, and the Cubmaster is to the left.

CUBMASTER: Tonight we have Cub Scouts who will embark on a new adventure in Scouting. Will those Scouts of Akela gather with their parents over on the left side of the bridge?

CUBMASTER: (to parents) During the years you and your sons have been in Cub Scouting, we have had numerous opportunities to work together along your trail. Your boys have reached the age to enter Boy Scouting. I’m sure you and your sons will find the same satisfactions there that you found in Cub Scouting. As a symbol of the growth of your sons and their entrance into Boy Scouting, I will ask that you lead them before me and prepare to guide them across the bridge into Boy Scouting when I obtain permission for your sons to enter their council camp.

CUBMASTER: Hello! Scouts of Troops!

SCOUTMASTER: Hello! Cub Scouts of Akela! What do you desire?

CUBMASTER: I have Cub Scouts of Akela’s council ring who have prepared themselves for entrance into the council rings of Troop(s) _____ and who all wear Cub Scouting’s highest award, the Arrow of Light. (leave last part off if they haven’t earned the Arrow of Light)

SCOUTMASTER: Bring them forward to the bridge that joins our council rings.

(Cubmaster leads parents and boys to the bridge. Scoutmasters cross the bridge and are introduced to parents and boys.)

CUBMASTER: Boys, it has been a sincere pleasure knowing and working with you. In a few moments, you will no longer be Webelos Scouts. I hope and pray that the desire, eagerness, interest and free spirit you have shown in Cub Scouting carries over into your families, church, school room, circle of friends, and everything you do in your lives.

The trail to Eagle still lies ahead of you. It takes a strong desire, a willingness to sacrifice, and a lot of guts sprinkled with a lot of love, to make it. So, this is just the starting point. Keep the fire going, and the desire going within you and from this base camp. May your travels be onward and upward and may you have a marvelous journey toward being a successful, active, contributing citizen of the community.

Boys, you have contributed much to your den and pack, and we shall miss you and your parents. You leave us to enter the Scout Troop of your choice. There, I’m sure, you’ll continue to grow in Scouting skills and friendships.

Now that you are leaving our pack and Cub Scouting, will you remove your neckerchiefs and give them to your parents? Your new Scoutmaster will soon present you with a token of your status as new Boy Scouts.

As you leave our council ring, I would like to present to you a token to start you on your new path (present Boy Scout handbook to each boy). Now cross over the bridge, and join your new council ring.

(Scouts and parents follow the Scoutmaster(s) across the bridge)

SCOUTMASTER: As Scoutmaster of Troop ___, I welcome you and your parents. There are many traditions in our troop, so many that we would not attempt to relate them all to you now. Instead, it is our pleasure to present you with this token of our council ring.

(Present boys with neckerchiefs. Have other Boy Scouts place them around their necks.) Wear it with pride as many have done before you. We welcome you to our troop with your first official handshake. (Scoutmaster shakes hands with each of the boys)

Will you join me in repeating the Scout Oath?

A Bridging Ceremony

The US Scouting Service Project again gives us this ceremony from Troop 6 of the Colonial Virginia Council. Thanks to Andrew Hagemann for this ceremony.

PERSONNEL NEEDED:

  • Scoutmaster
  • Assistant Scoutmaster
  • Senior Patrol Leader
  • Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
  • Webelos crossing over
  • Parents of Webelos crossing over

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • Table
  • Two candles
  • Bridge
  • Troop neckerchief
  • Red epaulets

ARRANGEMENT:

Darken the room. A single candle is burning on a table. The Webelos Scouts (their parents behind them) are lined up near the Scoutmaster who is standing beside the candle flame. The troop’s Senior Patrol Leader and the assistant Senior Patrol Leader are standing in the middle of a plywood bridge.

SCOUTMASTER: The flame you see before you represents the Flame of Knowledge. You Webelos Scouts who are bridging over to Boy Scouts have shown me that you bring with you a hunger for knowledge. The Scouting program offers you a special kind of knowledge that will serve you well as you walk the sometimes difficult road to manhood.

(Scoutmaster picks up another candle from the table where the Flame of Knowledge sits and holds it near the Flame but does not light it yet.)

SCOUTMASTER: The Flame of Knowledge never goes out as long as there are people who are willing to seek knowledge. It burns eternally in the mind of humankind as a beacon, casting its rays to guide us as we seek a higher level of understanding of our world.

(Scoutmaster lights candle.)

SCOUTMASTER: This candle represents a youth who seeks knowledge. Each of you Webelos here with me tonight is that youth.

(Scoutmaster hands the newly-lit candle to the nearest Webelos Scout.)

SCOUTMASTER: You have sought to continue building upon your Scouting knowledge by finding a Boy Scout Troop that will help you gain your ample portion of this special knowledge. Take custody of the Flame.

(Scoutmaster places candle in the closest boy’s hand.)

SCOUTMASTER: Hold this sacred Flame for a moment and then transfer this Flame to the next Webelos Scout. Hand it around from boy to boy until it reaches the last one of you in line who will return it to me.

(As the Flame is transferred from Scout to Scout, the Scoutmaster continues addressing the audience.)

SCOUTMASTER: Knowledge, once gained, must be shared. Each Boy Scout must pass on to other Scouts what he has learned. As you grow more experienced in Scouting, we will ask you to begin to return to Scouting some of what you have received from it. Work diligently as you pass down your Trail to Eagle Scout, and you will learn much that you can share with the others who come after you. Remember, you will receive from Scouting only what you put into it. I challenge you to work hard so that you will have much to give back.

(When the candle has made its way back to the Scoutmaster, he places the second candle in a holder that was placed well away from the original Flame. After a moment, he blows out the second candle. NOTE: The Flame of Knowledge is left burning as long as possible.)

SCOUTMASTER: See how easily that youth’s Flame was extinguished by the breeze of laziness? Don’t let laziness extinguish the Flame of Knowledge that burns in your own mind. Cherish your Flame by doing your best, by asking questions when you don’t understand, and by living up to the Scout Oath and Law.

(Pause for effect)

SCOUTMASTER: But, notice how the Flame of Knowledge that burns in the mind of humankind is still lit? From it, you can always re-light your own flame should the breeze of laziness blow too hard and snuff out your own Flame. Never stop learning. Never give the breeze of laziness a chance to blow.

SENIOR PATROL LEADER: Troop ___ invites the Webelos Scouts and their parents to join us on the Boy Scout side of Scouting by crossing over this symbolic bridge.

(As each Webelos reaches the middle of the bridge, the Senior Patrol Leader and his assistant stop him to remove the boy’s blue shoulder epaulets and replace them with red ones. After the red epaulets are in place, the Senior Patrol Leader then places the troop’s neckerchief OVER the boy’s Webelos version, removes the boy’s slide, puts it on the Troop neckerchief, and then slides away the old neckerchief. They hand the neckerchief and the blue epaulets to the boy’s parent.)

SCOUTMASTER: (While the Senior Patrol Leader is removing the first neckerchief) Notice that we removed the Webelos neckerchief after we placed the Boy Scout neckerchief on the Scout. We do this to be sure that there is no break in a boy’s Scouting career.

As the new Boy Scout exits the bridge, he and his parents are welcomed by his new troop’s Assistant Scoutmaster and by any Boy Scouts in attendance.

When all of the boys have bridged over, the Assistant Scoutmaster asks the new Boy Scouts to take hold of the Troop flag with their left hand and raise the Scout sign with their right. He leads them in the Scout Oath.

My Son's Crossover Ceremony

This is the ceremony that we used for my son, Parker’s crossover. I know I found it somewhere on the internet, but I’m not sure where. If I should give you credit for this ceremony, please let me know.

We held our crossover at the Council’s campground, which has a lake. The Boy Scouts set up their camp on one side of the lake, and the ceremony was on the other.

In lieu of the bridge, the Boy Scouts rowed the Webelos across the lake in canoes. The Webelos then camped out with the Boy Scouts.

If you don’t have access to a location like this, you can use a bridge.

PERSONNEL NEEDED:

  • Cubmaster
  • Assistant Cubmaster
  • Webelos Den Leader
  • Scoutmaster
  • Senior Patrol Leader
  • Four Boy Scouts
  • Webelos crossing over
  • Parents of Webelos crossing over

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • Ashes from a previous campfire

ARRANGEMENT:

This ceremony was held outdoors near a campfire. The Boy Scouts are gathered on one side of the campfire. The Cub Scouts and parents are standing on the opposite side of the campfire. Four Boy Scouts are located at the north, south, east and west of the gathering–almost encircling the participants

CUBMASTER: Webelos of Pack ___, families and friends, we are gathered here for our graduation campfire and crossover.

There exists, in Scouting circles, a legend that Baden-Powell would take ashes from a ceremonial campfire and spread them into the next campfire. This was done to recall memories of past campfires and to highlight to all Scouts and Scouters the bonds that connect us with our fellow Scouts and Scouters around the world.

I have with me ashes symbolizing the campfires of your Cub Scout career. They contain the memories of the fun and friendship you have shared. Take a moment and remember.

(Pause, the throw the ashes into the fire)

CUBMASTER: In adding these ashes to our campfire tonight, we symbolically send greetings to our brother and sister Scouts around the world. And, as these ashes mingle with tonight’s campfire, we join the memories of our own past campfire experiences and those of Scouts that have come before us with tonight’s program.

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER: Let us bow our heads together. We now call upon the Great Spirit, Akela, for his blessing on all of these young men and everyone who has gathered in council tonight. May these young Scouts always strive to obtain the noblest and highest ideals in their lives. Let strength be their guide. Cause them to follow a straight trail and to never be a reason for others to waiver from the true path. Protect us for many moons to come. May the Great Master of all Scouts be with us until we meet again.

CUBMASTER: You have experienced much in your adventures in Cub Scouts. You have explored, learned, and grown as you progressed through the ranks. It is now time for you to take on new challenges outside our Pack. The winds from the four directions of the compass have thoughts to share with you.

BOY SCOUT NORTH WIND: I am the North Wind. People say I am cold, but to you I will always bring the warmest of winds because you have been true-blue Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts and have lived up to the Scout Law.

BOY SCOUT SOUTH WIND: I am the South Wind. I wish you good Scouting. Over hill and dale I have carried stories of you and your experiences. As Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts you have been happy, game, and fair – a credit to your den and pack.

BOY SCOUT EAST WIND: I am the East Wind. I wish you well. I have spread the story of our fun and happiness in Cub Scouting with Pack ___ and of how you lived up to the Cub Scout Promise and were fair and helpful.

BOY SCOUT WEST WIND: I am the West Wind. I would like everyone present to know that these graduating Webelos Scouts did not walk the Cub Scout trail alone. Each had the wonderful help and guidance of his parents. Parents, continue to help your boys go and grow!

ALL WINDS: (in unison) We will be with you forever. We wish you the best of luck in your travels and experiences on the Scouting trail.

WEBELOS DEN LEADER: During the years you and your son have been in Cub Scouting, we have had numerous opportunities to work together along the trail. Now our Webelos are leaving the pack to enter Boy Scouting. I am sure you are going to find the same satisfactions there that you have found in Cub Scouting. To symbolize your son’s growth and his entrance into Boy Scouting, I will divest him of his Webelos Scout neckerchief, and he will then be welcomed by Scoutmaster _____________ of Troop ___.

(Webelos Den Leader removes each boy’s neckerchief.)

SCOUTMASTER: (Name each boy), as Scoutmaster for Troop ___, I am pleased to receive you as you cross the bridge to Boy Scouting. Your achievements in Cub Scouting are well-known to us.

To tie the token of Membership, I introduce ___________, our Troop Senior Patrol Leader, to award our troop neckerchief.

(Senior Patrol Leader places the troop neckerchief on each boy.)

SCOUTMASTER: On behalf of Troop ___, we welcome you to Boy Scouting. May your trail not be broken until you too, reach the realm of the Eagle. As your scoutmaster, I will challenge you to soar to great heights and continue to reach the highest award that a Boy Scout can achieve.

Jungle Book Ceremony for Advancing to Scouts

Edward A. Haluska wrote this ceremony and published it on the US Scouting Service Project.

PERSONNEL NEEDED:

  • Cubmaster
  • Scoutmaster
  • Boy Scouts from the patrol that the Webelos will be joining
  • Webelos crossing over
  • Parents of Webelos crossing over

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • Bridge (a small symbolic one is adequate)
  • New Boy Scout neckerchiefs
  • Suitable recorded music and speaker/sound system (optional)

ARRANGEMENT:

Bridge is centered in the stage area. The Scoutmaster is to the right of the bridge, and the Cubmaster is to the left. The music is mainly for the parents. During the crossing over, play something suitable.

CUBMASTER: The moon is full, just as it was long ago on that night in the jungle when Mowgli first joined the Seeonee wolf pack. It has been many years since Mowgli returned from living with the wolves. After he returned, he taught us many of the lessons he learned while in the jungle. The most important was that the strength of the wolf is the pack, and the strength of the pack is the wolf. That is why we are here tonight in this council ring. But just as Mowgli had to leave the pack, tonight we also have some man cubs among us who have grown strong and tall. The time has now come when they too must leave the pack to find their place in the world of men. They have learned many lessons as they have walked the trails of the Bobcat, Tiger, Wolf, and Bear. But tonight, because these cubs are ready to begin their next adventure on their way to manhood, we will not look to the way of the jungle for guidance. Instead, we will read from a book that men use when they seek wisdom.

To everything there is a season,
A time for every purpose under heaven:
A time to be born, and a time to die;
A time to plant, and a time to pluck what is planted;
A time to kill, and a time to heal;
A time to break down, and a time to build up;
A time to weep, and a time to laugh;
A time to mourn, and a time to dance;
A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones;
A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
A time to gain, and a time to lose;
A time to keep, and a time to throw away;
A time to tear, and a time to sew;
A time to keep silent, and a time to speak;
A time to love, and a time to hate;
A time of war, and a time of peace.

We have now come to the time and season when we must let go. So let us begin. Parents, bring forward these man cubs.

(Cubmaster calls out the names of the Webelos who will be advancing to Scouts. Parents and Webelos come forward and face the rest of the pack.)

CUBMASTER: Akela of the humans!

SCOUTMASTER: What is it that you want, Akela of the man cubs?

CUBMASTER: We have among us several boys who have grown tall in body and strong in character. They have learned well the ways of the pack, but now they yearn to run with other boys who are also between their childhood and manhood. They have been with the pack for many moons and have been a source of pride for us all. But it is now the season when they must leave us.

SCOUTMASTER: We understand. Bring them to the bridge between us.

(If you have recorded music, start it now.)

(Cubmaster now leads the Webelos, one at a time, to the center of the bridge between Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. The boy is stopped at the center of the bridge, and the Cubmaster then removes the boy’s Webelos scarf. The Scouts of the patrol that the Webelos will be joining then place a Boy Scout scarf on the boy and lead him to their group.)

Akela: Although these boys are no longer with our pack, we still call on the Great Akela of all Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts to always guide their way. We ask that the Great Akela watch over them as they learn to soar with the Eagles. And, in the fullness of time, after the great wheel of life has turned full circle, when the season again comes to the time to gather in, and the moon is full, we pray that these boys will return, tall and proud and strong, and present their own man cubs to be accepted into the pack. But until then, let us send them on their way with a last wolf howl.

(Cubmaster leads pack in wolf howl.)

Bridge to Boy Scouting

An unknown Scouter penned this ceremony. It was posted on the US Scouting Service Project.

PERSONNEL NEEDED:

  • Webelos Den Leader
  • Scoutmaster
  • Den Chief (torchbearer)
  • Boy Scouts
  • Senior Patrol Leader
  • Webelos crossing over
  • Parents of Webelos crossing over

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • A rustic bridge with railings made of dead tree branches and floored with scrap lumber
  • Two campfires (artificial ones for indoors)
  • Camp candle lantern to be carried by the torchbearer
  • Boy Scout neckerchief

ARRANGEMENT:

This impressive ceremony for Webelos Scouts can be used indoors or outdoors. If this ceremony is held indoors, the room should be darkened.

A campfire is at each end of the bridge. The Webelos Scout and his parents are seated around one campfire; the Boy Scouts around the other.

WEBELOS DEN LEADER: Webelos, please stand and repeat the Scout Oath with me.

(Webelos and den leader repeat the Oath. )

WEBELOS DEN LEADER: Hello, Scouts of Troop ____.

SCOUTMASTER: Hello, Webelos Scouts of Akela, what do you desire?

WEBELOS DEN LEADER: We have several Webelos Scouts of Akela’s council ring who have prepared themselves for entrance into the council ring of Troop ____.

SCOUTMASTER: Bring him forward to the bridge that joins our two council rings.

(The Webelos den leader, accompanied by the torchbearer, leads graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents to the bridge. Scoutmaster crosses over bridge and is introduced to the parents and the Webelos Scouts.)

WEBELOS DEN LEADER: (Names each Webelos), you have contributed much to your den and pack, and we shall miss you and your parents. Now you are leaving us to enter the Boy Scout troop of your choice. There you will continue to grow in Scouting skills and friendships.

An important part of your Webelos Scout uniform is your neckerchief. Now that you are leaving our pack and Cub Scouting, will you remove your neckerchief and give it to me? Your new Scoutmaster will place about your neck the neckerchief of the troop you are to join.

(The Webelos Scouts remove their neckerchiefs and gives them to the Webelos den leader. The Scoutmaster now beckons the graduates to follow him across the bridge.)

SCOUTMASTER: (standing before the Boy Scout campfire) As Scoutmaster of Troop ___, I welcome you and your parents. There are many traditions in Troop ___ that will interest you.

(The Scoutmaster explains one or two traditions and mentions important troop activities planned for the near future.)

SCOUTMASTER: Now it is my pleasure to present to you the neckerchief of our troop.

(He places the neckerchiefs around the necks of the incoming Boy Scouts.)

SCOUTMASTER: Wear it with pride as many have done before you. Your Senior Patrol Leader, (name), now wishes to express the troop’s happiness in having you as a new member.

(The Senior Patrol Leader leads the troop in a cheer for the new Scouts. This can be followed by the troop song or a good Scout song.)

(Senior Patrol Leader the leads the troop in saying the Scout Law.)

Rope Crossover Ceremony

Our last ceremony was one of many written by Cindy Gagon of the Utah National Parks Council. You can find all of her ceremonies here.

This is a great ceremony for packs that don’t have a bridge.

PERSONNEL NEEDED:

  • Cubmaster
  • Pack Committee members
  • Scoutmaster
  • Boy Scouts from patrol Webelos will be joining
  • Webelos crossing over
  • Parents of Webelos crossing over

EQUIPMENT NEEDED:

  • Thick rope
  • Webelos neckerchief
  • Troop neckerchief
  • Rope lights or other battery operated lights

ARRANGEMENT:

The members of the pack committee stand to the left holding end of the thick rope. Drape one of the boys’ Webelos neckerchiefs on the rope.

The Cubmaster and a few boys from the patrol stand on the right and hold the other end of the rope. Drape the Boy Scout neckerchief on that side of the rope.

Have each group hold the rope taut. If possible, lower the lights and use the rope lights or battery operated lights to light the ground following the line of the rope.

The outgoing Webelos and their parents stand on the Cub Scout side of the rope.

CUBMASTER: The time has come for (say name of each boy) to cross over to the Boy Scout Troop. The Cub Scout pack committee stands firm on one end of the rope to hold it up for you to cross safely to the other side, just as they looked out for you and watched over you during
your years in our Cub Scout Pack. On the other end of the rope waits your new patrol standing just as firm to keep the rope tight for you to make your way to them. They will continue to hold the rope for you as you learn new things that will prepare you for the Eagle Rank. Look to your fellow scouts to lead you, and in turn, look behind you to those that follow you. We as your Cub
Scout Pack wish you well and will be right behind you all the way!

(The Webelos will then follow the rope and the lighted path to the other end and meet with his new Scoutmaster who will place the new neckerchief on him.)

Leave a comment to share your favorite crossover ceremonies!

Yours in Scouting,
Sherry

P.S.  If you’re looking for an Arrow of Light ceremony, read this post.  And don’t forget to order your AoL arrows from Vince’s Arrows!  Use coupon code cubscoutideas for 10% off.

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3 thoughts on “My 7 Favorite Cub Scout Crossover Ceremonies

  1. Brian

    We have recently started using the Arrowmen from our local Order of the Arrow chapter to assist in the crossover ceremony. When queued, the Arrowmen enter and walk throughout the room ceremoniously until they reach the front of the room. After a brief story, they call the Webelos crossing over and lead them across the bridge. They are welcomed by their new Boy Scout Troop where the leaders put on new epaulets and a Troop neckerchief.

    This has been well received by all in attendance and gives the younger scouts something else to look forward to.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Top 10 Arrow of Light Ceremonies for Cub Scouts | Cub Scout Ideas

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